BUY SECOND HAND, RARE, OUT-OF-PRINT AND COLLECTABLE BOOKS. PARK VIEW BOOKS. LIST OF FICTION TITLES

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1. ----: Super Cimema Annual 1953. London: Fleetway Publications, 1953. Quarto-size hardback in pictorial boards. Evidence of use, but complete and in acceptable condition. 160 pages. Stories based on the latest films of the time (e.g. Robin Hood, The Man from Planet X, The Crimson Pirate), illustrated with photographs, articles and a quiz. (Stock ref 285) 5.00

2. Ainsworth, Harrison: The Lancashire Witches. Nelson, Lancs: H. Gerrard Ltd, 1965. New Edition of Harrison Ainsworth's 'The Lancashire Witches', first published in 1848. The Manchester-born historical novelist and lawyer, Harrison Ainsworth (1805-82) was a very popular 19th Century writer, whose other books include 'The Tower of London', 'Windsor Castle' and 'Guy Fawkes'. This novel is set in the early 17th Century, and is about 'the last days of the witches; of the time when Mother Demdike and Mother Charrox...terrorised the whole countryside around Pendle'. Hardback book (16 cm tall), bound in green cloth, with gilt lettering to spine, in original, unclipped dust jacket. In very good condition, with a little foxing on rear endpapers and edgewear to dustjacket. 572 pages. (Stock ref 734) 5.00

3. Amis, Kingsley: Take a Girl Like You. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1968. 1960s Penguin with cover illustration by Louis Klein. Reprint of book first published by Penguin in 1962, and which first appeared in 1960. Mass market paperback in good condition. Some reading creases and sunning of page edges. 317 pages. 'The Virgin's Progess of attractive little Jenny Bunn, come south to teach...' 'The best novel Mr Amis has written; it has the comic gusto, the loathing of pretension that made "Lucky Jim" so engaging and high-spirited' (Elizabeth Jennings in The Listener). (Stock ref 284) 4.00

4. Amis, Kingsley: The Anti-Death League. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1968. First Penguin Edition of book, which was first published in 1966. Mass market paperback in good condition. Very slight reading creases on back of cover and sunning on top of page edges. 304 pages. Kingsley Amis's story of sinister military plans, spies, double agents and triple bluffs is set against a background of indolent officers' fun and games, with women, with each other and with a hidden new weapon, which was just a red herring to keep everyone guessing about the real nature of their secret schemes.' (Stock ref 275) 4.00

5. Andrews, Mary Raymond Shipman: The Counsel Assigned. London: Bickers & Son, 1912. First English Edition of book published in the same year. This story about Abraham Lincoln is by the American novelist, Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews (1860-1936), who is best known for her 'The Perfect Tribute' (1906), about the reception of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. Her other stories include 'A Good Samaritan (1906) and 'White Satin Dress' (1930). Small hardback book (19 cm tall x 12 cm), bound in illustrated board covers, showing head of Lincoln, with cloth spine. Tissue covered black/white frontispiece ('But Lincoln Stood Guard') of Lincoln in courtroom scene. Good condition, with some edgewear and marks to covers. 43 pages. (Stock ref 731) 6.00

6. Bashford, Sir Henry: Augustus Carp Esq. by Himself. London: Heinemann, 1966. Subtitled, 'Being the autobiography of a Really Good Man', this humorous 'autobiography' was originally published anonymously in 1924. Described by Anthony Burgess as 'one of the great comic novels of the twentieth century', it was written by the distinguished physician, Sir Henry Bashford. First Heinemann Edition with an introduction by Anthony Burgess. 8vo hardback book. In very good condition, in very good dustjacket. 274 pages. (Stock ref 86) 15.00

7. Bennett, Alan: The Clothes They Stood Up In. London: Profile Books/London Review of Books, 1998. First Edition. 112 pages. Small paperback in very good condition. The story was originally read by Alan Bennett on Radio 4 for Christmas 1997. (Stock ref 390) 4.00

8. Besant, Sir Walter: The Master Craftsman. New York and London, Frederick A. Stokes, 1896. First US Edition of novel by the novelist, biographer and historian, Sir Walter Besant (1836-1901). Founder of the Society of Authors, and editor of 'The Author', his other books include 'Early French Poetry', 'Captain Cook', The Pen and the Book', 'All Sorts and Conditions of Men' and 'For Faith and Freedom'. 8vo hardback book (19cms tall), attractively bound in green pictorial cloth covers, with gilt and black decoration/lettering. In good, clean condition. Slight edgewear to hard covers, some damage to front pastedown, where an inscription has been scratched out, frontispiece plate missing and a little foxing. Sensible price for edition that is hard to find in UK. 354 pages. (Stock ref 681) 8.00

9. Birkett, H.F.: The Book of Overton. J & E Bumpus, 1928. First Edition. 8vo book, bound in its original blue cloth covers with white paper spine label, in very good condition. In a good, unclipped dust jacket with some edgewear/small closed tears at the top and bottom of d/j over spine. Very slight foxing on one or two pages. The copy has the added interest of having originally being sold through a bookseller in Ulverston in Cumbria, where the author lived. There is the following label on the front pastedown endpaper: 'W. Norcliffe, Printer, Stationer and Bookseller, 4, Market Street, ULVERSTON'. 220 pages. By the Cumbrian author, H.F. Birkett, whose other books include ‘Today and Yesterday: short stories in a North-country setting’ and ‘The Isle of Dreams’. The book is described as ‘a work of Imagination, and the characters are fictitious. With its other ingredients is mixed a little Historical Truth, and the Literary Remains are authentic. The Curious may desire to visit Overton. It is not this or that Overton of their knowing and the maps, but that Other of the distinction and character the author has desired to celebrate. If it is difficult to locate that is his fault – perhaps his intention’. In his Preface, Birkett regrets that ‘No longer can any part of England be left in peace. Every sanctuary of the quiet life is invaded. The invaders may be the kindliest of people, but they come and their ideas conquer even in the remotest country places, which aspire quickly to be up to date’, and declares his intention to ‘catch something of the old aloof spirit of a North-country town, whose very isolation made for the development of its hardy nature’. (Stock ref 270) 35.00

10. Borrow, George: Lavengro. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1939. Reprint of Edition first published by Dent in 1906. Small hardback book, bound in red cloth boards, with gilt lettering on spine. Very good condition, in quite good, unclipped dust jacket with (closed) tears on top/bottom edges. 550 pages. The linguist, historian, traveller and writer, George Borrow (1803 – 81), a ‘larger-than-life’, eccentric character, with a remarkable aptitude for learning languages, joined the British and Foreign Bible Society in 1833, and worked as their agent first in Russia and then in Spain, which led to his most successful book, ‘The Bible in Spain’ (1843). After leaving the British and Foreign Bible Society in 1840, Borrow married and settled down in Oulton, Suffolk, where he pursued his interests in languages and history, and, in response to the critical and popular acclaim that had followed his first book, worked on what was intended to be an autobiography. However, when ‘Lavengro’ was published by John Murray in 1851, the reaction was one of disappointment. Although the book contains a lot of autobiographical material, there are also tales of Borrow’s encounters with gypsies, and of his relationship with the beautiful Isopel Berners, where readers were unable to distinguish between fact and fiction. In the Preface, Borrow himself describes the book as ‘a dream, partly of study, partly of adventure, in which will be found copious notices of books, and many descriptions of life and manners, some in a very unusual form’. However, the book has become a minor classic of 19th century English literature, with the critic, Theodore Watts-Dunton, maintaining that passages in it are ‘unsurpassed in the prose literature of England...for mere perfection of style – for blending of strength and graphic power with limpidity and music of flow’. Introduction by Thomas Seccombe. Index. (Stock ref 406) 9.00

11. Borrow, George: The Romany Rye. London: Ward, Lock & Co. (undated, c. 1900). This is the sequel to Borrow’s ‘Lavengro’. Published by John Murray in 1857, it attracted the same kinds of criticism as the earlier book: indeed, Borrow went out of his way to arouse hostility by including a lengthy Appendix, in which he defends ‘Lavengro’ and denounces his critics and those people and views he disagrees with or dislikes (Roman Catholics, foreign influences, Jacobitism, radicals). Like ‘Lavengro’, ‘The Romany Rye’ received greater appreciation after Borrow’s death, and is described by Herbert Jenkins, in his biography of Borrow (1912), as ‘A ‘“spiritual autobiography”. It reveals the man his atmosphere, his character...It gives a better and more convincing picture of Borrow than the most accurate list of dates and occurrences...It is impression applied to autobiography’. Illustrations. 8vo hardback, bound in red cloth, with gilt decoration and lettering on front cover and spine. Good overall condition. Some bumping of corners of cover and sunning of spine. Slight foxing on some page edges. No dust jacket. 363 pages. (Stock ref 209) 12.00

12. Bradbury, Ray: Fahrenheit 451. London: Corgi, 1972. Reprint of book first published by Corgi in 1957, and which first appeared in 1954. Mass market paperback edition of Ray Bradbury’s gripping science fiction story. Good condition. 158 pages. ‘Montag stooped and touched the muzzle. The Mechanical Hound growled and ist deadly silver needle extended upon the air, pulled back, extended again. The growl simmered in the beast and it looked at him. Montag sensed that the Mechanical Hound had, somewhere in its fantastic mind, a hatred for him...Montag began to be afraid’. (Stock ref 454) 4.00

13. Braine, John: Waiting for Sheila. London: Eyre Methuen, 1976. First Edition. With a master's insight John Braine explores the delicate web of tensions, compromises and unspoken fears that underlie a marriage. Ex-library hardback book in good condition with dust jacket. 192 pages. (Stock ref 163) 6.00

14. Brason, John: Howard's Way 2. London: Grafton Books, 1986. Grafton Original First Edition. Paperback, in very good condition, with very slight edgewear on top of back soft cover. 240 pages. The second book of the popular 1980s BBC TV series: ‘Tom Howard was worried about his and Jack Rolfe’s claim to ownership of the Mermaid Boatyard and the new boat Tom had designed. If they lost the case, all his sacrifices and his broken marriage would have been for nothing...’. TV tie-in, with cover showing Tony Anholt as Charles Frere and Tracey Childs as Lynne Howard. (Stock ref 417) 4.00

15. Broster, D.K.: Child Royal. London: William Heinemann, 1937. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth boards, stamped 'ex libris', but no other library marks. In very good condition, but with slight foxing on page edges and tattered dustjacket, with open tears over spine. 329 pages + Heinemann advert at end. D.K. Broster (Dorothy Kathleen Broster, 1877 - 1950) was educated at Cheltenham Ladies' College and St Hilda's College, Oxford, where she read History. A writer of historical fiction, she achieved fame with her Jacobite Trilogy, 'The Flight of the Heron' (1925), 'The Gleam in the North' (1927) and 'The Dark Mile' (1929). Her other books include 'The Yellow Poppy' (1920) and 'The Captain's Lady' (1947). This novel is about the childhood of Mary, Queen of Scots: 'She was only five years old, that crowned child, when the French galleys bore her out of the Clyde to her upbringing in the court of France and to her life-long dower of love and disaster'. (Stock ref 51) 8.50

16. Buchan, John: Four Tales. London: William Blackwood & Sons, 1949. Reprint of edition first published in 1936. Awarded as a school prize in 1952. 8vo hardback, bound in red cloth boards with black lettering on spine. In very good condition; no dust jacket. 632 pages. A collection of four of John Buchan’s best known and most popular stories: ‘The Thirty-Nine Steps’ (1915), ‘The Power-House’ (1916), ‘The Watcher by the Threshold’ (1902) and ‘The Moon Endureth’ (1912). John Buchan (1875 -1940), as well as being a prolific and successful author of fiction and non-fiction books, was an administrator, journalist, publisher and MP, who was appointed Governor-General of Canada in 1935 (a post which he held until his death), and was elevated to the peerage, as Baron Tweedsmuir of Elsfield, in the same year. (Stock ref 448) 7.00

17. Carey, Rosa N.: Averil. London: The Religious Tract Society (undated) Beautifully presented novel, probably dating from the late 1890s/early 1900s, emphasizing Christianity/Christian virtues, by the author of 'Esther Cameron's Story' and 'Merele's Crusade'. Frontispiece colour illustration. 8vo hardback book (19cms tall approx.) , bound in decorated cloth covers, showing two adults and a child in Edwardian dress on front cover and two ladies feeding geese on spine. In very good condition overall, but with very slight lean some edgewear/foxing. 276 pages. (Stock ref 679) 10.00

18. Carnell, John: New Writings in SF16. London: Dennis Dobson, 1970. First Edition. A collection of original science fiction stories by Colin Kapp, Douglas R. Mason, Sydney J. Bounds, Christopher Priest, Michael G. Coney and James White, with a Forward by the Editor. 8 vo hardback book, bound in black cloth. Very good condition. No dust jacket. 190 pages. (Stock ref 564) 10.00

19. Clarke, Roy: The Last of the Summer Wine. London: Granada Publishing, 1983. First Granada Publishing Edition. Photograph of Peter Sallis as Clegg, Bill Owen as Compo and Brian Wilde as Foggy on front cover. Mass market paperback in good condition with crease on top corner of back cover. 160 pages. The hilarious novel based on BBC TV’s popular series, in which Clegg, Compo and Foggy attempt to ensure that Sam achieves his last wish: ‘a final frolic with the delectable Lily’. (Stock ref 407) 4.00

20. Davison, Frank Dalby: Man Shy. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1934. First UK Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in brown cloth with red lettering on spine, in original, unclipped dust jacket. Good condition, with slight foxing on front and back boards and front loose endpaper and open tear and edgewear to d/j. 204 pages. A novel by the Australian writer, farmer and environmentalist, Frank Dalby Davison (1893-1970), whose other books include ‘The Wells of Beersheba’, ‘The Wasteland’ and ‘The Road to Yesterday’. About a heifer which comes to value freedom more than anything else, the book won the Australian Literature’s gold medal for the best novel published in 1931, and is described as ‘a story of men and cattle in the Queensland bush, set down with the utmost simplicity out of a complete understanding of wild life’. The eight black/white illustrations are by the artist and big game hunter, Frank Wallace. (Stock ref 381) 20.00

21. De la Roche, Mazo: Mary Wakefield. London: Macmillan, 1949. First Edition. 8vo hardback, bound in beige cloth boards with dark brown lettering on spine. Very good condition, in good, attractively illustrated, unclipped dust jacket with some tears. 301 pages. The 3rd book (in order of writing) in Mazo de la Roche’s ‘Jalna Series’, or ‘Whiteoak Chronicles’, focuses on Mary Wakefield, the English governess brought over to Canada to teach Meg and Rennie, the children of Philip Whiteoak: ‘pretty Mary, soon the centre of a violent family dispute, has a stiff struggle with some of the Whiteoak clan, and it is not until a flood of emotions, both tender and violent, has been released, that life at Jalna resumes its fertile course’. The Canadian novelist, Mazo de la Roche (1879-1961) began her 16-volume ‘Whiteoak Chronicles’, which traces the history of the aristocratic Whiteoak family for a century (1854 – 1954) with ‘Building of Jalna’ (1944), and brought it to an end with ‘Centenary at Jalna’, in 1958. However, the novels were not written in the order that the events they describe occur, and can be read independently of each other. (Stock ref 371) 7.00

22. De la Roche, Mazo: The Whiteoak Brothers. London: Macmillan, 1954. First Edition. The 6th book (in order of writing) in Mazo de la Roche’s ‘Jalna Series’, or ‘Whiteoak Chronicles’, is set in 1923, and ‘In this new work there is the same spaciousness of outdoor life, combined with an intense concentration of family relations with the old house’. The Canadian novelist, Mazo de la Roche (1879-1961) began her Whiteoak Chronicles, which traces the history of the aristocratic Whiteoak family for a century (1854 -1954), with ‘Building of Jalna’ (1944), and brought it to an end with ‘Centenary at Jalna’, in 1958. However, the novels were not written in the order in which the events they describe occur, and can be read independently of each other. 8vo hardback, bound in beige cloth boards with green lettering on spine and front cover. Very good condition, in good, attractively illustrated, unclipped dust jacket with small closed tears at top of d/j over spine. 269 pages. (Stock ref 192) 8.00

23. De la Roche, Mazo: Variable Winds at Jalna. London: London: Macmillan, 1955. The 15th book (in order of writing) in Mazo de la Roche’s ‘Jalna Series’ or ‘Whiteoak Chronicles’, and the immediate sequel to the events narrated in ‘Renny’s daughter’. As far as the characters are concerned, ‘Few come through it altogether unscathed, but for nearly everyone the outcome is fortunate, so far as can be foretold, and the story ends with more than one peal of wedding bells’. The Canadian novelist, Mazo de la Roche (1879 – 1961) began her Whiteoak Chronicles, which traces the history of the aristocratic Whiteoak family for a century (1854 – 1954), with ‘Building of Jalna’ (1944), and brought it to an end with ‘Centenary at Jalna’, in 1958. However, the novels were not written in the order that the events they describe occur, and can be read independently of each other. Reprint (July 1955) of First Edition published in March 1955. 8vo hardback, bound in beige cloth boards with green lettering on spine and front cover. Very good condition, in good, attractively illustrated, unclipped dust jacket with closed tear at top of d/j over spine. 314 pages. (Stock ref 168) 5.00

24. de Liefde, J.B.: A Brave Resolve or The Siege of Stalsrund. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1894. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1894. A novel about the siege of Stralsund (1628), during the Thirty Years War, which is subtitled 'A Story of Heroism and Adventure'. 8 black and white illustrations. 9th Edition of scarce boook. 8vo hardback book, bound in decorated red cloth, with black and gilt lettering on front cover and spine. Complete and in fair condition, but with some damage to cover at top of spine and evidence of use in slight grubbiness and looseness in binding. 363 pages. (Stock ref 106) 14.00

25. Delderfield, R.F.: The Dreaming Suburb. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1958. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth, with gilt lettering on spine, in very good condition, in good, unclipped dust jacket, which has edgewear and a closed tear over back cover. 446 pages. R.F. Delderfield's book about the life of the inhabitants of a suburban avenue from the end of the First World War to the beginning of the Second: '..a story of boom, slump, full employment, unemployment, new freedoms, new restrictions, hope, faith and despair; a tale of the Charleston, the General Strike, the hunger-marchers, the amateur blackshirts, the Peace Ballot; of Amy Johnson, Al Jolson, and a strident Austrian comedian, who was said to gnaw carpets, but wasn't so screamingly funny after all.' R.F. (Ronald Frederick) Deldefield's (1912-72) other novels include 'A Horseman Ridng By', 'To Serve Them All My Days' and 'The Avenue Goes to War'. (Stock ref 50) 50.00

26. Doyle, Roddy: Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. London: Secker & Warburg, 1993. Hardback book in excellent 'as-new' condition, in prisyine dustjacket.. Novel tracing 'the triumphs, indignities and bewilderment of Patrick Clarke and his world, full of warmth, cruelty, love and slaps across the face'. 282 pages. (Stock ref 616) 1.50

27. Drabble, Margaret: A Summer Bird-Cage. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974. Reprint of first published by Penguin in 1967. Margarety Drabble's first novel about two sisters, Sarah and Louise, was first published in 1963. Mass market paperback in very good condition. 208 pages. (Stock ref 628) 2.50

28. Drabble, Margaret: The Middle Ground. New York: Bantam, 1982. Reprint of book first published in 1980. 'Kate's journey - which is, after all, a detour and not a dead-end - provides the touching, telling truth in Margaret Drabble's provocative, absorbing new bestseller'. Mass market paperback in very good condition. 257 pages. (Stock ref 629) 4.00

29. Drabble, Margaret: The Needle's Eye. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974. Reprint of book first published by Penguin in 1973, and which was originally published the previous year. 'Simon Camish, an embitttered barrister, would probably not have particularly noticed Rose Vassiliou had he not been asked to drive her home one night after a dinner-party. Yet at one time she had been notorious, her name constantly in the news'. Mass market paperback in veru good condition, with a liitle edgewear to soft covers. 399 pages. (Stock ref 630) 3.00

30. Drabble, Margaret: The Needle's Eye. London: Book Club Associates, 1973. Reprint of book first published by Weidenfeld and Nicolson in 1972. 'Simon Camish, an embitttered barrister, would probably not have particularly noticed Rose Vassiliou had he not been asked to drive her home one night after a dinner-party. Yet at one time she had been notorious, her name constantly in the news'. 350 pages. 8vo hardback book, bound in blue cloth, with gilt lettering to spine. In very good, unclipped dust jacket. (Stock ref 657) 4.00

31. du Maurier, Daphne: The Progress of Julius. London: Arthur Barker, 1948. Daphne du Maurier’s third novel, first published by William Heinemann in 1933, concerns the ambitious, ruthless and evil entrepreneur, Julius Levy, whose obsession with his daughter, and inability to let her go, results in his murdering her. The story moves from the France and Paris of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71), during which France suffered defeat and humiliation, to Algeria and then London, as Julius develops his chain of restaurants, builds up his business empire, and achieves the appearance of respectability through public recognition, marriage and family life. The story ends with his return to France, where he eventually suffers a stroke and dies. 1948 Reprint of book published by Heinemann in 1933. The novel is also known as ‘Julius’. 8vo hardback, bound in light blue cloth boards, with dark blue lettering on spine. Generally good condition, with some foxing on front cover, three small stains on back cover and small closed tear at bottom of spine. No dust jacket. 285 pages. (Stock ref 214) 13.50

32. Everett Green, E.: Priscilla: A Story for Girls. London: Thomas Nelson and Sons (undated). Delightful novel, in the 'Nelson's Library for Girls' series, by the prolific author Evelyn Ward Everrett-Green, who also wrote under the names H.F., E, Ward, Evelyn Dare, Cecil Adair. Frontispiece and three other colour plates by H.L. Bedford. Small hardback book, bound in decorated green cloth with black lettering. Good condition, with very slight looseness of text block in covers and some fading to covers and foxing on page edges. Stamp on front loose endpaper of Buxey's Ltd. Bookseller, Stationers and Newsagents of Bridge Street, Southampton. 352 pages. (Stock ref 589) 8.50

33. Farnol, Jeffery: Charmian Lady Vibart. London: Sampson, Low (undated). First published in 1932, this edition of 'Charmian Lady Vibart' dates from late 1940s/early 1950s. 8vo hardback, bound in red cloth, with black 'JF' monogram on bottom right-hand corner of front cover and black lettering on spine. In very good condition. In good, dramatically-illustrated, clipped dust jacket, with photograph of Jeffery Farnol on back, which has some edgewear/small tears. Previous owner's name written neatly on front loose endpaper. 176 pages. Born in Birmingham, but brought up in London, where he had the opportunity to get to know the countryside of Kent, which features in his novels, the poular historical and romantic novelist, Jeffery Farnol, began his career as an engineer, subsequently studying at Westminster School of Art. At the end of the 19th Century, he went to the United States, where, in the hope of earning some extra money, he wrote a book, 'The Broad Highway', which was submitted to, and submitted to, and published (1910) by, Sampson Low, who published his many other books, which include 'The Amateur Gentleman' (1913), 'Beltane The Smith' (1915', 'Black Bartlemy's Treasure' (1920) and 'The Happy Harvest' (1939). Some of the characters from Farnol's first book, 'The Broad Highway', re-appear in this book: 'This is a story of love - the love of the fiery Charmian for her husband and reckless son, and the passion her beauty arouses in the hearts of two ruthless men. She is caught in a plot for her destruction whose evil ingenuity is equalled only by her charm and woman's wit. "A man," she says, "is no match for a desperate determined woman." Jeffery Farnol sets his story in Regency times when differences were settled by duels, and its fast-moving adventure sparkles with subtle humour.' (Stock ref 46) 13.50

34. Farnol, Jeffery: The High Adventure. London: Sampson, Low (undated). Historical mystery novel first published in 1926. This Edition dates from the late 1940s/early 1950s. 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth, with black 'JF' monogram on right-hand bottom corner of front cover, and black lettering on spine. In good condition, with slight rubbing of corners of hard covers. In dramatically-illustrated, clipped dust jacket, with photograph of Farnol on back, which has some edgewear and open tear over lower part of spine. 191 pages. Born in Birmingham, but brought up in London, where he had the opportunity to get to know the countryside of Kent, which features in his novels, the poular historical and romantic novelist, Jeffery Farnol (1878-1952), began his career as an engineer, subsequently studying at Westminster School of Art. At the end of the 19th Century, he went to the United States, where, in the hope of earning some extra money, he wrote a book, 'The Broad Highway', which was submitted to, and published (1910) by, Sampson Low, who published his many other books, which include 'The Amateur Gentleman' (1913), 'Beltane The Smith' (1915', 'Black Bartlemy's Treasure' (1920) and'The Happy Harvest' (1939). In this novel: 'A sense of speed and brilliancy seems to flash from the pages as one follows the varied fortunes of Jeremy Veryan, who started out to seek the "High Adventure", and found it in the cause of championing the reckless and profligate Richard Armadale, all to win the love of his ill-fated sister, Olivia. Knight Errant this indeed - for his dreams are achieved through sheer courage and strength, amidst murderous enemies cloaked in brave finery. Jasper Shrig's astute unravelling of the mystery places him in the first rank of fiction detectives.' (Stock ref 47) 9.00

35. Fielding, Henry: Tom Jones (2 vols). London: Odhams Press (undated; probably 1920s). 2 vol. Odhams Press Edtion of Fielding's novel about the adventures of the 'foundling', Tom Jones, which was first published in 1749. Attractively bound in red cloth with gold lettering. Generally good condition, but with some foxing on the cover of Vol I. No dust jackets. The price quoted and the number of pages is for the two volumes. 944 pages (2 vols). (Stock ref 177) 17.50

36. Fine, Anne: Madame Doubtfire. London: Penguin, 1994. First Penguin Film Tie-In Edition, to coincide with the film ‘Mrs Doubtfire’, directed by Chris Columbus, and starring Robin Williams, Sally Field and Pierce Brosnan. Cover pictures of Robin Williams as Mrs Doubtfire on front cover, and other cast members on back cover. Mass market paperback in very good condition. 175 pages. ‘A vast apparition towered over her on the doorstep. It wore a loose salmon pink coat, and tucked under its arm was an enormous imitation crocodile skin handbag. “I’m Madame Doubtfire, dear”’. (Stock ref 395) 4.00

37. Gainham, Sarah: Maculan's Daughter. London: Macmillan, 1973. First Edition. Espionage story by Sarah Gainham, author of 'Night Falls on the City' and 'Private Worlds'. 8vo bookk, bound in black cloth boards. Ex-library copy and some evidence of use in some wear to hard covers, but otherwise good, clean and complete. No dustjacket. 479 pages. (Stock ref 648) 4.00

38. Galsworthy, John: Flowering Wilderness. London: William Heinemann, 1932. First Edition. 8vo hardback, bound in green cloth. Good condition. 280 pages. No dust jacket. The second book in the third and final trilogy of novels about the Forsyte family and their friends and acquaintances by the Nobel Prize-winning author, John Galaworthy, OM (1867-1933). (Stock ref 449) 4.50

39. Garner, Alan: The Guizer. London: Hamish Hamiton, 1975. First Edition. By the author of 'The Weirdstone of Brisingamen', 'Elidor' and 'The Owl Service', this collection of short stories is subtitled: 'A Book of Fools'. 'In a collection of astonishing range and power, Alan Garner presents the Guizer [the Fool] as he has found him at the heart of our beliefs, a figure that has influenced basic philosophies and complex thought...The extraordinary language employed is only one of its facets...by returning to primary texts, Alan Garner has given back meaning and dignity to a much abused level of culture'. Illustrations. Notes and Sources. Bibliography. Large hardback book (25.5 cms tall) in very good, unused condition, bound in orange cloth, with gilt lettering on spine. In fine, unclipped dust jacket. 213 pages. (Stock ref 717) 15.00

40. Godden, Rumer: China Court. London: Book Club, 1961. Book Club Edition. Bound in red. Good condition in good dust jacket. Novel about the Quinn family, china clay works owners, who live in China Court, a house in a remote village on the Cornish moors. 280 pages. (Stock ref 506) 5.00

41. Golon, Sergeanne: Angelique (book One) The Marquise Of The Angels. London: Pan, 1966. 9th printing of Pan Edition, which first appeared in 1962, The book was originally published in the UK by Heinemann in 1959. Hard-to-find paperback in very good condition, with some edgewear to soft cover. The first novel by husband and wife team Anne and Serge Golon featuring Angélique, ‘a dazzling girl whose passionate spirit enmeshed her in the intrigues of Louis XIV’s glittering court and the black terrors of the Inquisition. Here is an enormous stage people by the mightiest – and the lowliest – figures of the seventeenth century, and at the centre, Angélique – half angel, half devil, wholly woman!’ Film tie-in with front cover colour picture of Michelle Mercier, and back cover black/white picture of Michelle Mercier and Robert Hossein, from the 1964 Francis Cosne film, ‘Angélique, Marquise des Anges’. 511 pages. (Stock ref 129) 35.00

42. Golon, Sergeanne: Angelique (book Two) The Road To Versailles,. London: Pan, 1965. The second novel by husband and wife team Anne and Serge Golon featuring Angélique, ‘The unforgettable heroine whose fantastic adventures have given an entirely new meaning to historical romance’. ‘The Road to Versailles’ finds Angélique in ‘Seventeenth-century Pars – for the green-eyed, golden-haired Angélique, a city of terror and despair. Penniless and deprived of title, sworn to kill the men who had caused her husband’s death, Angélique plunges into the underworld – to the squalid Court of Miracles, home of the villainous, the degraded and the deformed – a world of violence and lust. Spurred by a relentless ambition, her only weapons her beauty and courage, Angélique begins the slow climb back to wealth and power; and always before her the glittering court of the Sun King Himself’. Translated by Rita Barisse. 8th printing of Pan Edition, which first appeared in 1961. The book was originally published in the UK by Heinemann in 1959. Hard-to-find paperback in good condition, with some edgewear/grubbiness to distinctive soft cover. 349 pages. (Stock ref 130) 17.50

43. Golon, Sergeanne: Angelique In Love. London: Pan, 1966. The sixth novel by husband and wife team Anne and Serge Golon featuring Angélique, ‘The unforgettable heroine whose fantastic adventures have given an entirely new meaning to historical romance’. In ‘Angélique in Love’, Angélique, ‘the emerald-eyed beauty who was queen of the Paris underworld, favourite of Louis XIV and a friend of the persecuted Protestants of Poitou, leaves the land where she has suffered so much and embarks on a strange vessel, the “Gouldsboro”, commanded by the enigmatic, masked pirate, Rescator...The voyage has surprises for Angélique ...a face that seems familiar; a memory, long buried, emerging uncertainly, hesitatingly; a voice that has changed. What does the future hold for her – happiness that she does not believe possible, or a life irretrievably ruined?’ Translated by Marguerite Barnett. 3rd printing of Pan Edition, which first appeared in 1965. The book was originally published in the UK by Heinemann in 1963. Used paperback in good condition, with some edgewear/grubbiness to distinctive soft cover. 430 pages. (Stock ref 131) 10.00

44. Golon, Sergeanne: The Countess Angelique (Part 1) In The Land Of The Redskins. London: Pan, 1969. 3rd printing of Pan Edition, which first appeared in the same year. The book was originally published in the UK by Heinemann in 1967. Used paperback in good condition, with some edgewear to distinctive soft cover. 255 pages. The seventh novel by husband and wife team Anne and Serge Golon featuring Angélique, ‘The unforgettable heroine whose fantastic adventures have given an entirely new meaning to historical romance’. In this book, Angélique, ‘On the far frontier of New France...enters a rough, masculine world of warring settlers, fierce Iroquois, and lonely soldiers whose hungry eyes watch her every movement...She risks her life to save Outakke, the savage Mohawk chieftain from treachery and death...and the people of theFive Nations bow down before her..Never has the emerald-eyed beauty attracted so much attention, seen such handsome men, or faced so many perils’. Translated by Marguerite Barnett. (Stock ref 260) 6.00

45. Gordon, Richard: Doctor on the Boil. London: William Heinemann, 1970. First UK Edition of Richard Gordon’s ninth hilarious book about the medical personnel of St Swithin’s Hospital, which include such entertaining characters as the irascible Sir Lancelot Spratt and the work-evading Dr Grimsdyke. ‘The golden formula...grafting Wodehouse on to the Lancet’ (New Statesman). 187 pges. 8vo hardback in very good condition in very good dust jacket. (Stock ref 460) 6.00

46. Gordon, Richard: Doctor on Toast. London: Michel Joseph, 1961. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in black cloth, with gilt lettering on spine, in very good condition. In very good, attractively-designed, price clipped dust jacket, which has slight edgewear and two very small closed tears. 203 pages. By the author of the popular series of ‘Doctor’ novels, which include ‘Doctor in the House’, ‘Doctor at Sea’ and ‘Doctor in Clover’, many of which were also successful films and the basis of a 1970s TV series. This novel includes a host of comic characters, including Dr Grimsdyke, Sir Lancelot Spratt, Captain Spratt, the Bishop of Wincanton and Mr Justice Fishwick: ‘Dr Grimsdyke’s well-known genius for disaster finds abundant scope...When he falls in love with a beautiful model, she is unfortunately already the fiancée of a room-mate from his student days...And when Grimsdyke ingeniously gets himself aboard a liner where the young lady is posing for cruise advertisements, he suffers a voyage which he finally regards as one of the major disasters in maritime history’. (Stock ref 459) 6.00

47. Greene, Graham: Brighton Rock. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1952. Reprint of Graham Greene’s (1904-91) famous novel, first published by Penguin in 1943, and which was originally published in 1938. 1950s Penguin in distinctive orange and white wrapper. Good condition and clean inside, but some marks on cover.250 pages. ‘Half of London pours into Brighton on a bank holiday, and if one man dies there on the beach, who will pause for more than a curious moment...In rapid, taut strokes, Graham Greene lays bare the soul of a boy of seventeen, whose shadow seared the lives of the men who followed him and the girl who loved him...Pinkie, the boy with death at his fingertips was not just bad – he worshipped in the temple of evil...In “Brighton Rock” there is a deep mystery, and yet it is no “mystery story”. Here is a rare adventure...a psychological action-story. It is the literature of excitement, distilled from a rare blending of mood, scene, and character – a novel which, when it is finished, seems to have been injected into the veins.’ (Stock ref 492) 4.00

48. Greene, Graham: The Quiet American. London: William Heinemann, 1955. First Edition. "I never knew a man who had better motives for all the trouble he caused." That is how Fowler, the English newspaper correspondent, describes the quiet American, Alden Pyle, who had arrived in Indo-China on an unspecified mission.Graham Greene's new novel...is a modern variant on a theme which in the last century attracted Mark Twain and other writers: a study of New World hope and innocence set in an old world of violence.' Graham Greene got the idea for the book from a visit to Saigon in 1951, and he spent three years researching it. It aroused criticism and controversy in the United States, due to its portrayal of the central American character as over-idealistic and naive. 8 vo hardback book, bound in dark blue cloth boards with gilt lettering on spine, in distinctive, unclipped grey-green dustjacket. In very good conditIon, with slight evidence of wear/sunning on front boards and of edgewear to d/j. Name of previous owner written on front loose endpaper. 247 pages. (Stock ref 6) 150.00

49. Harding, Emily Grace: Hazel or Perilpoint Lighthouse. Newcastle-Upon-Tyne: The Walter Scott Publishing Company (undated). 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth boards, with gold lettering and floral decoration on spine. List of other publications by publisher at end of book. Stamp on front loose endpaper, staing book awarded as prize for attendance at Hippings Wesleyan School, Oswaldtwistle. Fair condition. Looseness of text block in covers. Spine detached on one side. Missing copyright and title pages, and rear loose endpaper. Numbers written on front endpapers and rear pastedown endpaper. No dust jacket. Sensibly priced for condition. 452 pages. (Stock ref 642) 4.00

50. Hardwick, Michael and Mollie: The Upstairs and Downstairs Omnibus. London: Book Club Associates, 1975. Of interest to fans of the popular 1970s ITV series, based on the lives of members of a wealthy and well-connected Edwardian family and their servants, and to those interested in TV programmes of that period, this collectable book brings together and abridges the stories of five of the main characters (Mr Bellamy, Mr Hudson, Mrs Bridges, Rose and Sarah), which were published as separate books. ‘These five stories together represent a skilful and authentic evocation of a period and its people and their fascinatingly contrasting attitudes towards life and to one another’. 8vo hardback in very good condition in good dust jacket. Minor wear on edges of d/j and slight foxing on flyleaf. 573 pages. (Stock ref 169) 18.50

51. Harris, Joel Chandler: Uncle Remus or Mr Fox, Mr Rabbit and Mr Terapin. London: The R.S. Surtees Society, 1992. First Edition. Facsimile book first published in England by George Routledge & Sons in 1881, which contains Joel Chandler Harris' classic tales. Fifty illustrations by A.T. Elwes. Introduction by Roy Kerridge. 248 pages. 8vo hardback book, bound in brown cloth, with black lettering and illustrations, in very good condition, in transparent dust wrapper. (Stock ref 324) 12.50

52. Hay, Ian: Housemaster. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1938. Reprint (August 1938) of book first published in 1936. Bound in blue cloth and in good condition. Some sunning of spine and no dust jacket. 320 pages. Ian Hay's (John Hay Beith) 1930s story about public school life, based on his experiences as a teacher before the First World War. (Stock ref 424) 10.00

53. Henty, G.A.: Beric The Briton. London and Glasgow: Blackie & Son (undated). In Blackie's 'The Talisman Library' series of abridged versions of popular English authors. Subtitled, 'A Story of the Roman Invasion', the novel is set in Britain during the reign of the Emperor Nero, shortly after the conquest under Claudius by the Roman general, Aulus Plautius. Beric is a British boy who takes part in Queen Boudicca's revolt against the Romans, is captured and taken to Rome, where he becomes a gladiator. Finally, after many adventures, he is able to return to Britain. The original novel by G.A. (George Arthur) Henty (1832-1902) was published in 1893. Henty was a prolific writer of historical adventure books, and his other works include 'The Young Buglers: A Tale of the Peninsular War', 'Bonnie Prince Charlie: A Tale of Fontenoy and Culloden' and 'With Lee in Virginia: A Story of the American Civil War'. 'Beric the Briton' first appeared in The Talisman Library in the 1920s, and this copy probably dates from 1940s or early 1950s. Hardback book (18 cm tall), bound in beige cloth with black lettering to front cover and spine. Black/white frontispiece illustration by W. Parkinson of Beric rescuing a Christian girl from a lion. 11 pages of Notes on text. Good condition. Slight edgewear to hard covers and a little foxing. No dust jacket. 182 pages. (Stock ref 727) 6.00

54. Heyer, Georgette: A Civil Contract. London: Heinemann, 1961. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth, with 'GH' stamped on the front board and gilt lettering on spine. Good condition, with some creasing over spine. No dust jacket. 394 pages. Late novel by the prolific and hugely popular author of historical fiction, Georgette Heyer (1902-74), whose other books include 'These Old Shades', 'The Black Moth' and 'Regency Buck'. The novel recounts the efforts of ex-soldier, Viscout Lynton, to overcome the problems caused by the debts that encumber the estate he inherits from his father. While deciding between the attractions of the lovely Julia Oversley and the less beautiful, but loyal and supportive Jenny Chawleigh, Lynton eventually makes a fortune on the stock exchange, and decides that he he was right to marry the latter, even though he did so for the sake of her father's wealth. (Stock ref 49) 22.50

55. Heyer, Georgette: Arabella. London: The Book Club, 1950. Romance by by the prolific and hugely popular author of historical fiction, Georgette Heyer (1902-74), whose other books include 'These Old Shades', 'The Black Moth' and 'Regency Buck'. 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth, with black lettering on spine. In good, clean condition, with a little fading to spine and bumping of corners of hard covers. No dust jacket. 275 pages. (Stock ref 641) 3.50

56. Heyer, Georgette: The Unknown Ajax. London: Heinemann, 1959. First Edition of historical novel by the prolific and hugely popular author of historical fiction, Georgette Heyer (1902-74), whose other books include 'These Old Shades', 'The Black Moth' and 'Regency Buck'. 8vo hardback book, bound in red boards in quite good condition. Slight looseness of spine and evidence of use, but clean copy. No dust jacket. 314 pages. (Stock ref 194) 6.00

57. Heyer, Georgette.: The Grand Sophy. New York: The Berkeley Publishing Group/Jove, 1985. Fourth Printing of Paperback Edition of novel by by the prolific and hugely popular author of historical fiction, Georgette Heyer (1902-74), whose other books include 'These Old Shades', 'The Black Moth' and 'Regency Buck'. Mass market paperback in good, clean condition, with some creasing/edgewear to soft covers. 313 pages. (Stock ref 640) 2.00

58. Hilton, Agnes Aubrey: Midsummer Madness. London/New York: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK)/Macmillan (undated). 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth, with illustration on front cover and black lettering on front cover and spine. Frontispiece illustration by the author. Late 19th Century. In good condtion, with some sunning/wear on cover. 114 pages. Sticker on front loose endpaper showing that this copy was awarded as a Sunday School prize at St Luke's, Chesterton, Cambridge. By the novelist and religious writer, Agnes Aubrey Hilton, whose other books include 'An Imaginative Child', 'In the Garden of God', 'Tales of the Women Saints of the British Isles' and 'Gaudeamus'. (Stock ref 25) 10.00

59. Hilton, James: Nothing So Strange. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1947. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in tan cloth, with green lettering on front cover and spine. In very good condition, in good dust jacket (with photograph of Hilton on back), with some tears and edgewear. 308 pages. Born in Lancashire, James Hilton (1900-54) was educated at The Leys Schol, Cambridge and Christ's College, Cambridge. He worked as journalist and published a number of novels in the 1920s and 1930s, 'Catherine Herself' and 'The Passionate Year'. He achieved world-wide fame with 'Lost Horizon' (1933), following this with the equally popular 'Goodbye Mr Chips' (1934) and 'Random Harvest' (1942), all of which were made into successful films. He was also in demand as a Hollywood scriptwriter. 'Nothing So Strange' is the 'story of two modern people - a young American [Dr Mark Bradley] who, both as a scientist and as a man, faced some of the biggest problems of our times; and the girl who gave him all her heart and brain...Probing yet protective, Jane's love makes the strong thread in a pattern of deeply moving and significant events - strange events, too - and yet, to quote Daniel Webster, there is often "nothing so strange" as the truth'. (Stock ref 52) 45.00

60. Hitchcock, Alfred (ed.): A Month of Mystery (Book Two). London: Pan, 1973. Mass market paperback in very good condition. A collection of stories by authors including E.C. Bentley, Sax Rohmer and Gerald Kersh. 241 pages. (Stock ref 498) 4.50

61. Hitchcock, Alfred (ed.): Stories My Mother Never Told Me. London: Pan, 1966. First Edition of the 1966 Pan edition of Part 1 of he original book, which was first published in 1964. Very good condition. 256 pages. Fifteen horror short stories and a novelette by such authors as Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl and F. Scott Fittzgerald, selected by Alfred Hitchcock. 255 pages. (Stock ref 290) 3.50

62. Hope, Ascott R.: A String of Stories. London: Sunday School Union (undated: 1890s). Delightful and collectable late Victorian book by the author of 'A Peck of Troubles' and 'The Daughter of the Regiment', a collection of eight stories, including 'Master and Man', 'Seventy Years Ago', and 'Jack of All Trades'. Black/white sketches by Paul Hardy. Hardback book (19cms tall) , bound in illustrated red cloth covers, with illustrations and black lettering on front cover and spine. 160 pages. 16 page catalogue of books suitable as prizes and presents, published by the Sunday School Union, at end of book. In good condition, with some sunning of cover. School Board for London sticker on front pastedown stating copy awarded as a prize to Dorothy Rous 'for punctual and regular attendance' at Victoria School, during the school year ending 30th September, 1894. (Stock ref 27) 10.00

63. Hornby, Nick: How to Be Good. London: Viking (Penguin), 2001. First Edition. 8vo hardback, bound in green, in very good condition. In very good dust jacket. 244 pages. ‘According to her own complex moral calculations, Katie Carr has earned her affair. She’s a doctor...and doctors are decent people...her husband David is the self-styled Angriest Man in Holloway. When David suddenly becomes good, however...Katie’s sums no longer add up, and she is forced to ask herself some very hard questions. Nick Hornby’s brilliant new novel...asks that most difficult of questions: what does it mean to be good?’ (Stock ref 418) 4.00

64. Hurd, Douglas and Osmond, Andrew: Send Him Victorious. London: Companion Book Club, 1968. Book Club Edition of political novel, co-authored by former foreign secretary, Douglas Hurd, written in the late 1960s, which looks forward to the political situation in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in the mid 1970s. Hardback book, bound in beige cloth with gilt lettering on spine. In good condition, in original, unclipped dust jacket. Some foxing on pge edges and edgewar, small closed tear to d/j. Sensibly priced. 253 pages. (Stock ref 678) 1.50

65. Ikkideh, Ime (ed.): Drum Beats: An Anthology of African Writing. Leeds: E.J. Arnold, 1968. First Edition. Ten stories by writers including James Ngugi, Camara Laye and Chinua Achebe, selected and introduced by Ime Ikkideh. Medium size book in attractively illustratd soft covers. In very good condition. 155 pages. (Stock ref 639) 5.00

66. Irwin, Margaret: Still She Wished for Company. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1979. Reprint (in association with Chatto and Windus) of 1963 Penguin/Peacock Edition. The book was first published in 1924. Mass market paperback in very good condition. Slight rubbing to top edges of cover. 202 pages. A 'strange and enchanting ghost-story, set in a no man's land betwen the eighteenth and twentieth century...Lucian the handsome dissatisfied eighteenth century roue uses his frail sister Juliana as a means to project himself into the future and court the twentieth century Jan, the girl he has seen only in his dreams'. By the author of the historical novels, 'Royal Flush', 'Young Bess' and The Stranger Prince'. (Stock ref 593) 12.00

67. Irwin, Margaret: Still She Wished for Company. Harmondsworth: Peacock/Penguin, 1963. First Paperback (Penguin/Peacock) Edition of book first published by Chatto and Windus in 1924. Mass market paperback in very good condition. Slight rubbing to top edges of cover. 202 pages. A 'strange and enchanting ghost-story, set in a no man's land betwen the eighteenth and twentieth century...Lucian the handsome dissatisfied eighteenth century roue uses his frail sister Juliana as a means to project himself into the future and court the twentieth century Jan, the girl he has seen only in his dreams'. By the author of the historical novels, 'Royal Flush', 'Young Bess' and The Stranger Prince'. (Stock ref 292) 15.00

68. Jay, W.M.L.: Holden with the Cords. London: James Nisbet & Co., 1884. English Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in dark blue cloth, with illustrations and gilt lettering on front cover and spine. In good condition, with attractive dark blue cover and gold lettering. 466 pages. Details at end of book of James Nisbet's 'Golden Ladder' series and 16 pages of advertisements for the publisher's books which were 'Suitable for Presents and Prizes by Well-Known and Popular Writers'. Copy awarded as prize for 'punctual and regular attendance' at the Four Lanes End Board School, by the Blackburn School Board in 1898. By the American author of 'Without and Within' and other novels with an explicit religious purpose. In response to critics who claim that discussion of religion does not belong in novels, the author writes (Preface): 'I do write for the "gentle readers" who enjoy religion in novels as elsewhere...There are two classes of novels - the descriptive and the analytical; one pictures real life, the other passions and motives. Religion has its rightful place in both, because it is an important part of real life, and controls both passions and motives. Finally...the modern novel being so potent a power...it is fair to say that it may do good service for religion.' 30.00E (Stock ref 23) 25.00

69. Jerome, Jerome K.: Three Men in a Boat. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1956. The humourist and novelist, Jerome K. Jerome’s (1859 – 1927) best known book. His others include ‘Three Men on The Bummel (1898) and ‘Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow’ (1886). The book concerns the hilarious Thames holiday adventures of the narrator, his two friends, George and William Samuel Harris and the dog, Montmorency (the book is subtitled, ‘To say nothing of the Dog’). ‘The chief beauty of this book lies not so much in its literary style...as in its simple truthfulness..Other works may excel this in depth of thought and size; but, for hopeless and incurable veracity nothing yet discovered can surpass it’ (From the author’s preface to the First Edition). 115th Impression (1956) of book first published in 1889. Small hardback book (19cms tall), bound in red cloth, with gilt lettering on spine, in very good condition, in very good, unclipped dust jacket. Black/white frontispiece.190 pages. (Book ref. BFDB00182) (Stock ref 182) 10.00

70. King-Hall, Magdalen: The Wicked Lady. London: Tandem, 1976. Magdalen King-Hall's classic tale of the wicked deeds of the notorious Barbara Skelton, 'The Wicked Lady Skelton', a character immortalized by Margaret Lockwood in the 1940s film: 'Bored with a loveless marriage, Lady Skelton embarked on a mad escapade to recover a gambling debt. Soon the dark, secret pleasure of the highway life, the night maraudings and savage rapture of the attack, took possession of her...She would be the Wicked Lady until the day she died...and beyond'. First Tandem Edition of book first published as 'Life and Death of the wicked Lady Skelton' in 1944. Mass market paperback (18cms tall), with dramatic cover illustration. In very good condition with slight edgewear/creasing to corners of soft covers. 186 pages. (Stock ref 190) 4.50

71. Kingsley, Charles: Hereward The Wake. London: Macmilan, 1910. Pre-First World War Edition of Charles Kingsley's 'Hereward The Wake: Last of the English', which was first published in 1866. The Anglican clergyman and social reformer, Charles Kingsley (1919-75), was rector of Eversley, Hampshire (1844-75) and professor of modern history at Cambridge (1860-9). His other books include 'The Water Babies', 'Alton Locke' and 'Westward Ho!'. Kinglsley's novel is based on the legends surrounding the 11th century anglo-saxon nobleman and outlaw, Herward the Wake, and his courageous resistance to the Normans, following the battle of Hastings (1066) and the conquest of England by William the Conqeror. 8vo hardback book (19cms tall), bound in light/dark green decorated cloth covers, with gilt lettering to front cover and spine. In good condition, with a little foxing and some wear to hard covers. No dust jacket. 373 pages. (Stock ref 674) 8.00

72. Kipling, Rudyard: Under the Deodars. Frome: The R.S. Surtees Society, 1987. First Edition. Facsilimile of volume of Kipling stories, first published by A.H. Wheeler of Allahabad in 1888, which include 'The Education of Otis Yeere', 'A Wayside Comedy' and 'The Hill of Illusion'. Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was a prolific writer and poet, whose well-known and celebrated books include 'Kim', 'The Jungle Book' and the 'Just So Stories'. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1907. 8vo soft cover book. 96 pages. In very good condition, in original dustwrapper, but bound upside down. (Stock ref 327) 5.00

73. Lamb, Charles and Mary: Mrs Leicester's School. London: Wells Gardner, Darton & Co. (undated). Popular Trefoil Series Edition of book first published in 1809. Late 19th Century small 8vo hardback book, bound in blue cloth, with black and white illustrations by C.E. Brock. In good condition, in dust jacket. Gilt lettering rubbed on spine, title page loose, and edgewear to d/j. 125 pages. Page of advertisements for publisher's other titles at end of book. By the brother and sister authors, Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834) and Mary Lamb (1764 -1847), perhaps best known for their 'Tales from Shakespeare' (1807), which was designed to make Shakepeare's works accessible to the young. Charles Lamb was also a poet, playwright and essayist, and author of 'The Adventures of Ulysses' (1808). Despite their literary success, the lives of both were overshadowed by mental illness. In 1796, insanity caused Mary Lamb to kill their mother, and her brother devoted the rest of his life to caring for her. 'Mrs Leicester's School', mainly written by Mary Lamb, is a collection of 10 stories, told by the pupils of a school in Hertfordshire. (Stock ref 26) 10.50

74. Le Sage (trans. Tobias Smollett): The Adventures Of Gil Blas Of Santillane. London: George Rouitledge, 1902. By the French author and playwright, Alain Rene Le Sage (1668 - 1747), this celebrated early 18th Centrury picaresque novel (romantic tales which deal with rogues and vagabonds) traces the ups and downs of the career of its central character, the Spanish adventurer, Gil Blas, who, from humble beginnings, eventually makes his way in the world and achieves wealth, success and respectability. This 1749 translation from the French is by the famous Scottish author, Tobias George Smollett (1721-71), who, after an early career as a surgeon, turned to journalism and novel writing, and whose books include 'Roderick Random', 'Peregrine Pickle' and 'Humphrey Clinker'. 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth, with gilt lettering on spine. Black rules on pages. Handcut pages. In good condition, with some sunning of spine and a little foxing on front and back endpapers. No dustjacket. 442 pages. (Stock ref 121) 25.00

75. London, Jack: The Call of the Wild. London: Heinemann Educational, 1964. Reprint. In 'The New Windmill Series'. Small hardback book. Good condition. Ex-school copy, with school sticker and name of previous owner on fro endpapers. 112 pages. (Stock ref 635) 2.00

76. Mallinson, Alan: An Act of Courage. London: Bantam, 2006. An adventure of the Napoleonic Wars, featuring Captain Matthew Hervey of the 6th Light Dragoons. Captain. This gripping story focues on the siege of Badajoz.: ''Most impressive... Mallinson reinforces his position as a master of narrative military history' (The Times). 496 pages. (Stock ref 126) 4.50

77. Mallinson, Allan: A Regimental Affair. London: Bantam, 2001. First Edition, signed by author on title page. Set in 1817, Alan Mallinson's novel involving Captain Matthew Hervey of the 6th Light Dragoons sees the regiment tackling Luddite violence, and being sent to Canada to deal with tension along the border with the United States. 'An exciting, fast-moving story full of bloody hacking with sabre and tulwar, which can at the same time be reflective and thoughtful about its setting and situation' (Evening Standard). In fine, almost 'as new' condition, in very good, unclipped cover. 8vo hardback book (24 cms tall), bound in red cloth covers, with gilt lettering to spine. Endpaper maps of 'Mellish's Seat of War in North America'. 326 pages. (Stock ref 116) 60.00

78. Mannin, Ethel (ed.): Children of the Earth. Leipzig: Bernhard Tauchnitz, 1930. Copyright Edition of Vol. 4946 of the Tauchnitz Edition of 'Collection of British and American Authors', co-published with Librairie Gualon & Fils, Paris. The stories are divided into three sections: 'Spring Tide'. 15 stories; 'Flood Tide', 13 stories; and 'Ebb', seven stories. Small volume (16 x 12 cms), bound in card, with black lettering to covers and spine. Advertisements for other punlications on back cover. Complete, firmly bound and in quite good condition, with a small portion of cover missing over top of spine, small tears around base of spine and some edgewear, tanning and grubbiness to soft covers. 334 pages. (Stock ref 654) 15.00

79. Marshall, Emma: Memories of Troublous-Times, Being the History of Dame Alicia Chamberlayne of Ravensholme, Gloucestershire. London: Seeley, Jackson and Halliday, 1880. First Edition. By the author of 'The Rochemonts', 'Lady Alice' and 'Joanna's Inheritance', Emma Marshall's book is set in Gloucestershire during the English Civil War. In the Preface, she explains that: 'The story of Mary Pennington, as it occurs in the following narrative, is not fictitious, but is taken word for word from a genuine autobiography of the seventeenth century...In weaving these extracts into the '"History of Alice Chamberlayne", I have endevoured to make the imaginary story and the real one harmonize with each other...The historical facts relating to the Siege of Gloucester are taken from "Bibliotheca Gloucestrensis", first published during the Civil War...The illustrations are mainly taken from old engravings...'. Six black/white illustrations, including Frontispiece of the old Cross at Gloucester, and tissue covered title page. Four page list of books by Emma Marshall and others. Hardback book (20cms tall), bound in decorated brown cloth with gilt coat of arms on front cover and gilt lettering on front cover and spine. In very good condition, with slight rubbing of edges/corners of hard covers. 316 pages. (Stock ref 29) 17.50

80. Marshall, Emma: Sir Valentine's Victory and Other Stories. London: James Nisbet & Co., 1883. Black/white illustrations. Presumed First Edition. 8vo hardback book, attractively bound in decorated blue cloth covers, with gilt lettering on front cover and spine. 16 pages of advertisements for other books published by James Nisbet. Complete, but shaken, so some (blocks of) pages loose and damage to cover at top of spine, which is reflected in price. 212 pages. A collection of stories by the author of 'Memories of Troublous-Times', 'Dewdrops and Diamonds' and 'Heather and Harebell'. (Stock ref 30) 8.50

81. Maugham, W. Somerset: Creatures of Circumstance. London: William Heinemann, 1947. First Edition. 8vo hardback, bound in red cloth boards, with silver lettering on spine and front cover, in very good condition, in good, unclipped dust jacket with some tears on d/j. 310 pages. A collection of short stories, including ‘The Colonel’s Lady’, ‘Appearance and Reality’, ‘A Woman of Fifty’, ‘A Casual Affair’ and ‘The Kite’ by a writer who is particularly celebrated for his short stories. In his Preface to the collection, Maugham writes: ‘Since the beginning of history men have gathered round the camp fire...to listen to the telling of stories. The desire to listen to them appears to be as deeply rooted in the human animal as the sense of property. I have never pretended to be anything but a story teller. It has amused me to tell stories and I have told a great many’. The novelist, short story writer and playwright, William Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) was born in France, and trained as a doctor before taking up writing, and achieving success with his novel, ‘Liza of Lambeth’ (1897). His other well-know novels include ‘Of Human Bondage’ (1915), ‘The Moon and Sixpence’ (1919), ‘Cakes and Ale’ (1930) and ‘The Razor’s Edge’ (1944). Many of his stories, including his famous short story ‘Rain’, have been turned into films. (Stock ref 472) 25.00

82. Maugham, W. Somerset: Princess September. London: Collins, 1970. Illustrations by Jacqueline Ayer. First UK Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in cream cloth boards with black lettering and floral illustration on front cover. Decorated endpapers. In excellent condition, in very good, unclipped illustrated dust jacket, with one small closed tear on top edge. Unpaginated. 33 pages. This delightful story about Princess September, daughter of the King of Siam, was first published by Somerset Maugham in the 1920s. 'The King of Siam had the charming habit of giving presents on his birthday instead of receiving them, and one year he gave each of his nine daughters a beautiful green parrot in a golden cage...One day, however, poor Princess September found her parrot lying dead at the bottom of its golden cage. While she lay on her bed crying bitterly, a beautiful little bird hopped into her room and started to sing a beautiful song. Thius began a wonderful friendship...the other princesses grew jealous...they persuaded Princess September that the only way to be sure of keeping her precious little bird was to put him in a cage.' (Stock ref 21) 15.00

83. Maugham, W. Somerset: Then and Now. London: William Heinemann, 1946. First Edition. A novel about three months in the life of the brilliant and scheming Florentine philosopher, politician and author of ‘The Prince’, Niccolo Maciavelli (1469 – 1527). In the foreword to this novel, Maugham writes: ‘No one could write a book of this kind out of his head, and I have taken what I wanted where I could find it. My chief source of information has naturally been the works of Machiavelli’. The novelist, short story writer and playwright, William Somerset Maugham (1874 – 1965) was born in France, and trained as a doctor before taking up writing, and achieving success with his novel, ‘Liza of Lambeth’ (1897). His novels other well-know novels include ‘Of Human Bondage’ (1915, ‘The Moon and Sixpence’ (1919), ‘Cakes and Ale’ (1930) and ‘The Razor’s Edge’ (1944). Many of his stories, including his famous short story ‘Rain’, have been turned into films. 8vo hardback, bound in blue cloth boards, with gilt lettering on spine and front cover, in very good condition, in very good, unclipped dust jacket. Minor closed tears at top and bottom of spine on d/j. Slight foxing on top page edges. 229 pages. (Stock ref 185) 20.00

84. Merriman, Charles Eustace: Letters From A Son To His Self-made Father. London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons/Boston: Robinson, Luce Company, 1904. 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth, with gold lettering on front cover and spine. In good overall condition, with slight foxing and bumping to covers and name of previous owner written in pencil on front loose endpaper. Open tears to corners of two pages and closed tear on another. 289 pages. By the American humorist, Charles Eustace Merriman, and subtitled as ‘Being the Replies to Letters from a Self-Made Father to his Son’, a collection of 20 letters from the son, Pierrepont Graham, to his father, John, a self-made Chicago businessman, during the 1890s. In the first letter, Pierrepont is a freshman at Harvard, trying, as he tells his father, to ‘reconcile your maxims of life with the real thing’. In the final letter, he outlines his philosophy of marriage, informing his father that: ‘You need not consider it necessary to continue your advisory letters to me. I can see I will receive all the advice I need from Mrs Pierrepont’. Illustrations by Fred Kulz. (Stock ref 401) 10.00

85. Meyrick, Gwenllian: Shed No Tear. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1961. First Edition of Gwenllian Meyrick's novel. 'At first, it seemed that nothing could spoil Catherine's "perfect" marriage with Hugo Thornton. Certainly there wasn't anything in the unkind gossip which linked Hugo with the mysterious Mrs Seymour. Or was there?'. 8vo hardback book. Ex-library copy, with dust jacket laminated on to boards. Corner of one page torn and some edgewear and grubbiness. Hence sensible price for quite a rare book. Good condition. 223 pages. (Stock ref 651) 10.00

86. Montgomery, L.M.: Kilmeny of the Orchard. London: George G. Harrap, 1940. Wartime Edition of quite a rare book by the popular Canadian author, L.M. (Lucy Maud) Montgomery, CBE (1874-1942), best-known for her 1908 novel, 'Anne of Green Gables', whose other books include 'Anne of Avonlea', 'Chronicles of Avonlea' and 'Anne of the Island'. 'Kilmeny of the Orchard', first published in 1925, is a romantic novel, set on Prince Edward Island, about a teacher, Eric Marshall, who falls in love with a mute girl, Kilmeny Gordon, who eventually learns to speak. 8vo hardback book (18cms tall), bound in blue cloth, with black lettering on the front cover and spine. In good condition, in original dustjacket. A little foxing on some pages and open and closed tears to d/j. 221 pages. (Stock ref 673) 12.00

87. Morecambe, Eric: Mr Lonely. London: Methuen, 1982. First Paperback Edition of book first published in 1981. Used paperback in very good condition. Picture of Eric Morecambe on front cover. 192 pages. A novel by the comedian, Eric Morecambe: ‘“Mr Lonely” is Eric Morecambe’s tribute to Sid Lewis, that great comedian from the south. From his early music-hall days, the boarding-house suppers, to the meteoric rise to TV fame and the champagne, the girls, the life “behind the scenes” – it’s all there and more. As you would expect from Eric Morecambe, this is a highly readable and enjoyable, laugh a minute novel, the heart-warming story of the trials and tribulations of Sid – lovable genius’. ‘I would call Eric the Samuel Pepys of the stand-up comic’. (Stock ref 357) 5.00

88. Mortimer, John: Titmuss Regained. London: Viking/Penguin, 1990. First Edition. Large 8vo hard back in very good condition, in very good dust jacket. 281 pages. 'In this tale of greed unbound met by the combined strengths of the green welly brigade, conservationists and ordinary people who wish to live undisturbed among fields and woodlands, John Mortimer gives us his strongest statement yet on our times.' 'In Paradise Postponed, John Mortimer's gifts as a comic writer are at their strongest...an hilarious novel and thoroughly recommended' (Daily Telegraph). (Stock ref 537) 5.00

89. Mortimer, Penelope: The Pumpkin Eater. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1964. This novel by Penelope Mortimer (1918-99), whose other books include ‘Daddy’s Gone A-Hunting’ and ‘Long Distance’, tells ‘the story of the emotional breakdown of a mother of many children and of her husband’s estrangement’. ‘One of those novels which seem to be written with real knowledge of the brink of the abyss, taut almost beyond endurance’ (Sunday Times). Film tie-in with picture of Anne Bancroft from the 1964 Jack Clayton film, also starring Peter Finch and James Mason, with screenplay by Harold Pinter. Reprint of First Penguin Edition of 1964 (book first published in 1962). Mass market 1960s paperback, in good condition, with slight edgewear to soft cover. 157 pages. (Stock ref 213) 4.00

90. Orczy, Baroness: I Will Repay: A Romance. London: Eveleigh Nash & Grayson, 1922. An Early Edition of the second of Baroness Emma Orczy's (1865-1947) novels about the Scarlet Pimpernel (Sir Percy Blakeney), which was first published in 1906. Her many novels, starting in 1899, with 'The Emperor's Candlesticks', and endin in the year of her death, also include 'The Scarlet Pimpernel', 'The Elusive Pimpernel' and 'Sir Percy Hits Back'. 8vo hardback book, bound in blue cloth boards, with indented gtitle on front cover and gilt lettering to spine. In good condition, with some tanning and bumping to hard covers. No dust jacket. Sensibly priced. 307 pages. (Stock ref 661) 12.00

91. Pargeter, Edith: Sunrise in the West. London: Macmillan, 1974. First Edition. In very good condition, in very good dust jacket. 342 pages. Edith Pargeter's (Ellis Peters) exciting historical novel, which is the first in the quartet (the others are 'The Dragon at Noonday', 'The Hounds of Sunset and 'Afterglow and Nightfall') about the 'Brothers of Gwynedd', the princes of Gwynedd: Llywelyn ap Gruffydd (Griffith), who sought to secure Wales' independence, and his brother David. (Stock ref 286) 17.50

92. Peake, Mervyn: Captain Slaughterboard Drops Anchor. London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1945. This is the scarce Second Edition of this delightful book about the adventures of the bold and bad pirate, Captain Slaughterboard. The original edition was published early in the Second World War, but destroyed as a result of enemy action. 'Mervyn Peake's pirate story is designed for boys (and girls) who like their pirates bold, bad and realistic. His imagination has the quality, at once horrifying and poetic, of the child's own invention and if his drawings frighten timid parents, they will certainly attract normal children, and the story itself is fun.' For this Edition, published in 1945 by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Peake coloured the 48 original black and white plates. Large 8vo hardback book, bound in original beige linen boards, with green lettering on front cover. In good condition, with name of previous owner written on front loose endpaper. Open tears on illustrated white, unclipped dust jacket and top and bottom of spine and slight staining. Unpaginated. 48 pages. (Stock ref 7) 195.00

93. Potter, F. Scarlett: A Wild Goose Chase or The Adventure of Giles Culverwell. London: SPCK (undated). Black and white frontispiece and illustrations at the beginning and end of each chapter by A. Pearce. Late 19th Century. 8vo hardback book, bound in grey cloth, with covers beautifully decorated with blue and green flowers, and title in gilt lettering and author's name in blue on front cover (gilt lettering on spine). In very good condition. Name of a previous owner is written on the inside of the cover. 158 pages. Subtitled, 'Or The Adventures of Giles Culverwell'. By the author of 'Heroes of the North' and 'Ambrose Oran', and published 'Under the Direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education Appointed by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge' (SPCK). (Stock ref 28) 30.00

94. Powell, Anthony: From A View to a Death. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1961. First Penguin Edition of book first published in 1933. Mass market paperback in good condition. Slight creasing to cover and a previous owner's name written on cover and flyleaf. 200 pages. By the novelist and scriptwriter, Anthony Powell (1905-2000), whose other books include 'Afternoon Men' and 'John Aubrey and His Friends'. 'Anthony Powell's third novel and possibly his funniest. The story is of a ruthless London artist who pursues his sexual and financial quarry in the county and near-county society of rural England'. (Stock ref 451) 4.50

95. Priestley, J.B.: The Shapes of Sleep. London: The Book Club, 1963. This novel is subtitled ‘A Topical Tale’: ‘It is not a novel, moving quickly from the first, deliberately mystifying and teasing, though not – this must be emphasized – a “mystery story” or thriller. It is essentially topical not only in manner but in what it is about, the kind of world it presents with searching comment and much sardonic humour’. After military service during the First World War, the Bradford born novelist and playwright, J.B. (John Boynton) Priestley, studied at Cambridge and then took up writing, achieving success with his novels, ‘The Good Companions’ (1929) and ‘Angel Pavement’ (1930). He was also a celebrated playwright (‘Dangerous Corner’ and ‘An Inspector Calls’); a popular broadcaster (particularly through his wartime ‘Postscripts’ broadcasts for the BBC); the author of works of non-fiction, such as ‘English Journey’ (1934); and a campaigner for social justice and against nuclear weapons. Book Club Edition of Priestley’s novel, which was published by William Heinemann in 1962. 8vo hardback, bound in green boards with black lettering on spine, in very good condition. In very good, strikingly-designed, unclipped dust jacket, with minor closed tears on d/j at top and bottom over spine. 250 pages. (Stock ref 204) 4.00

96. Rolfe, Frederick William: Hadrian VII. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1982. Novel first published in 1904 by eccentric writer (his other boooks include 'Stories Toto Told Me'), historian and artist, Frederick Willliam Rolfe (1860-1913) , a convert to the Roman Catholic Chiurch, who was refused ordination. In the novel, he imagines an Englishman becoming Pope: 'Hadrian the Seventh is intimately drawn from the life of his strange creator, Fr Rolfe. Both men were Catholic converts, both unsuccessful candidates for the priesthood who led bitter lives, refusing to relinquish their calling. Only in the novel does the shabby outsider triumph, in a series of daring and colourful acts that are conveyed with the intensity of dreams and fantasies'. Paperback in good condition. 368 pages. (Stock ref 438) 4.00

97. Rushdie, Salman: Haroun and the Sea of Stories. London: Granta Books, 1990. First Edition. Salman Rushie's adventure novel about Haroun and his determination to rescue his father, the story-teller and Shah of Blah. 8vo hardback book, in very good condition, in dust jacket. 224 pages. (Stock ref 437) 4.00

98. Sharpe, Tom: Omnibus: Indecent Exposure, The Great Pursuit, Porterhouse Blue and Blott on the Landscape. London: Guild Publishing, 1991. Omnibus Edition, which includes four of Tom Sharpe’s hilarious stories: Indecent Exposure (1973), The Great Pursuit (1976), Porterhouse Blue (1974) and Blott on the Landscape (1975). ‘Here in this bumper volume are four four side-splitting novels by one of Britain’s funniest and most popular writers. Tom Sharpe’s unique style of raucous fun and outrageous satire is as uproarious when he writes of the eccentricities of the English upper classes and archaic Cambridge colleges as when he wreaks havoc on the literary world or those living in South Africa’. Complete and unabridged. 8vo soft cover book in good condition. Slight creasing on corners of front cover. 784 pages. (Stock ref 334) 6.00

99. Sharpe, Tom: Riotous Assembly. London: Arrow Books, 2002. First Arrow Books Edition. Large paperback in very good, ‘as-new’ condition.306 pages. Comic novel with South African setting: ‘...has done to the South African Police what “Catch-22” did to the American Air Force’. (Stock ref 319) 5.00

100. Sharpe, Tom: The Throwback. London: Pan Books, 1983. Mass market paperback in acceptable condition. Creasing and edgewar to soft covers. 222 pages. (Stock ref 633) 0.75

101. Siekiewicz, Henryk: Quo Vadis (A Tale of the Time of Nero). London: George Routledge, 1903. Early Edition of Henryk Sienkiewicz's novel, which was published in Polish in 1895, and translated into English by Dr S.A. Binion and S. Malevsky. Subtitled, 'Whither Thou Goest', this famous love story concerns the relationship that develops between a Christian woman and a Roman officer, and the persecutions they have to endure, during the reign of the Emperor Nero. The book was made into a celebrated movie in 1951, starring Robert Taylor and Deborah Kerr. 8vo hardback book (20 cms tall), bound in light blue cloth boards, with dark blue and gilt decorationand lettering. Deckle edge pages. In good condition, with some bumping edgewear to hard covers and a little foxing. Name of previous owner on front loose endpaper: 'Walter Henderson 19th Aug 1903.' 512 pages. (Stock ref 693) 8.00

102. Spark, Muriel: The Ballad of Peckham Rye. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1975. Reprint of book first published ny Penguin in 1963, and which first appeared in 1960. Novel by Muriel Spark (1918-2006), whose other books include 'The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie' and 'The Comforters': 'Dougal Douglas, MA, was hired to bring vision into the lives of the workers in a Peckham farm. And he did. To Peckham he introduced...absenteeism, fraud, blackmaul, violence, and murder. With a light laugh, of course'. Mass market paperback in good condition, with a little evidence of use 143 pages. (Stock ref 685) 3.00

103. Stevenson, D.E.: Amberwell. London: The Book Club, 1956. Book Club Edition of novel first published in 1955. 8vo hardback book, bound in beige boards. with black lettering on spine. in very good condition, in very good, unclipped dustjacket,. 256 pages. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Summerhills'. 'Amberwell' is set on the West coast of Scotland, on the estate belonging to the Ayrton family. It concerns the five youing Ayrtons, and their adventures: but 'the real "hero" of the story is Amberwell itself'. (Stock ref 617) 7.50

104. Stevenson, D.E.: Celia's House. London: Fontana, 1965. Second Impression of book first issued in Fontana in 1961, and first published in 1943. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Summerhills'. 'Celia's House' is a 'moving and poignant story of a family in conflict; of the young who are determined to lead their own lives, and of the older generations who are anxious to pass on intact all that they have helped to create'. Mass market paperback in fair condition, with some creasing/edgewear to soft covers and general evidence of use. 256 pages. (Stock ref 665) 8.00

105. Stevenson, D.E.: Charlotte Fairlie London: Collins, 1954. First Edition of quite hard-to-find novel by the popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), whose more than forty novels include 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Crooked Adam'. This is an ex-'Boots Booklovers Library' copy, so it is bound in orange cloth covers, with a green Boots Library stamp on the front cover, but no other stamps. 8vo hardback book (20 cms tall), in quite good condition, with a little foxng on page edges and edgewear to hard covers. Sensibly priced. No dust jacket. 320 pages. (Stock ref 676) 7.00

106. Stevenson, D.E.: Crooked Adam. London: Collins, 1969. Reprint Edition of book first published in 1942. 8vo hardback book, bound in tan cloth covers with gilt lettering. Unclipped dust jacket, protected by transparent plastic cover. Ex-library copy, but stamped only on front pastedown. Good condition. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Summerhills'. 'Cooked Adam', first published in 1942, as well as being a romance, is a tale of secret weapons, spies and counter-espionage against the background of the Second World War. 256 pages. (Stock ref 576) 15.00

107. Stevenson, D.E.: Fletchers' End. London: Fontana, 1971. Third Impression of Paperback Reprint of quite a rare book. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Summerhills'. 'The novel continues the story of Bel Lamington and tells of her marriage with Ellis Brownlee, a partner in the firm of Copping, Brownleee and Copping which owns large warehouses in the Pool of London...Bel becomes deeply interested in Miss Lestrange...It is six years since the death of this mysterious lady but her personality.has made such an impression upon all those with whom she came in contact that it still influences their lives - for good or ill'. Mass market paperback in very good condition, with a liitle edgewaer. 256 pages. (Stock ref 653) 12.00

108. Stevenson, D.E.: Sarah's Cottage. London: Collins, 1968. First Edition. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Crooked Adam'. 'Sarah's Cottage' is one of 'D.E. Stevenson's most attractice family sagas...One by one the characters of a large, attractive family make their appearancr, and, as in a well plotted play, their relationships are woven into a deeply satisfying story'. 8vo hardback book, bound in dark green cloth, with gilt lettering on spine. Ex-library copy, in good condition overall, in original, unclipped dust jacket, protected by transparent wrapper. Library satmp on front loose endpaper, sellotape marks on front and rear pastedowns, one loose page. Sensibly priced copy. 284 pages. (Stock ref 668) 16.00

109. Stevenson, D.E.: Summerhills. London: Collins, 1972. Reprint of book first published in 1956. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Crooked Adam'. In 'Summerhills', she 'tells the lives and loves of the Ayrton family...Against the background of Scottish moors - and a flying visit to Rome - these and other characters come vigorously to life and work and work out their problems.' 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth. Ex-library copy, in quite good condition overall, in original, unclipped dust jacket, protected by transparent wrapper. Open tear and looseness of a few pages at beginning of book, some bumping/ edgewear to hard covers and evidence of library stamps/use. 255 pages. (Stock ref 597) 10.00

110. Stevenson, D.E.: The English Air. London: Collins, 1968. Reprint of book first published in 1940. The popular Scottish novelist, Dorothy Emily Stevenson (1892-1973), wrote over forty novels, including 'Mrs Tim', 'Kate Hardy' and 'Summerhills'. 'The English Air' is set in the years of peace before the start of the Second World War and the early months of the war: 'It is a story of two people - and, through them, of two peoples - during two fateful years...Franz von Heiden, son of a Nazi official and an English mother...comes to England early in 1938 to visit his English cousins....Falling in love with Wynne [Braithwaite], he is further troubled at the thought of his mother's broken life in Germany...As tremendous events succeed each other...Franz's dilemma grows increasingly acute'. 8vo hardbasck book, bound in orange cloth, with silver lettering on spine. Ex- school library copy, in good condition, in unclipped dust jacket, protected by transparent wrapper. Slight looseness of text block, and some bumping of hard covers, foxing and evidence of library stamps/use. 286 pages. (Stock ref 596) 17.50

111. Stevenson, R.L.: St Ives. London: William Heinemann, 1924. Vol XV of the Tusitala Edition of Robert Louis Stevenson's (1850-94) works. By the author of 'Treasure Island', 'Kidnapped' and 'Catriona', this novel (subtitled: 'Being the Adventures of a French Prisoner in England') tels the story of the French officer, Capitaine Jacques St Ives, after he is taken prisoner by the British. The book was incomplete when Stevenson died, and it as finished by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (1863-1944), the author, literary critic and professor of English Literature at Cambridge. Small hardback book (17cms tall), bound in blue cloth, with Stevenson's signature impressed on front cover and gilt letterig to spine. In good condition, with some tanning/evidence of use to hard covers and foxing to page edges. No dustjacket. 378 pages. (Stock ref 675) 4.00

112. Stewart, Mary: Madam, Will You Talk? London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1954. Rare First Editon of Mary Stewart's celebrated first novel, which tells the story of two young English women, Charity Selborne and Louise Cray, who are taking a holiday in the South of France: 'Looking around at the guests of the hotel Tistet-Védène, Avignon, Charity found herself becoming more and more interested in a charming young boy who was curiously abrupt with his mother. Soon she was to discover something of the threat which hung over his head - and later over her own. The gay Provençal holiday with her artist friend Louise was to turn into something very different, something both terrifying and precious, after that memorable visit to Nîmes. For the moments Charity and young David spent gazing at the golden arches spanning the deep green Gardon were like the last brief lull before the thunder.' 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth with black lettering on spine. Good condition. Very slight sunning of spine, slight bumping of edges of boards and some foxing on a few pages. Previous owner's name written neatly on front loose endpaper. No dust jacket. 224 pages. (Stock ref 8) 150.00

113. Stewart, Mary: Mary Stewart Omnibus: Triple Jeopardy: My Brother Michael, Moonspinners, And, This Rough Magic. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1978. First Edition. 8 vo hardback, bound in dark brown, with gilt lettering on spine, in very good condition, in good dust jacket. 727 pages. Published together in one volume, these are three of Mary Stewart's most popular and enchanting novels, all set in the rich atmosphere of sun-baked Greece. (Stock ref 369) 5.00

114. Stewart, Mary: The Moon-Spinners. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1962. First Edition of Mary Stewart's popular novel, set in Crete, which became a successful film (with Hayley Mills) in 1964: 'This is the story of a hunt, through the savage countryside of the White Mountains of Crete. The quarry, two young Englishmen who by accident have stumbled on a scene of private vengeance, and must not be allowed to live to tell their story. The hunters, a group of people tied together by blood, and the bonds of greed. The deus ex machina, a girl who has never before met a situation - or a man - that she cannot deal with. In Crete, the young Nicola Ferris meets both'. 8vo hardback book, bound in blue cloth. In quite good condition, with some wear to cover. Some doodles on inside front/back endpapers and names of previous owners on flyleaf. Some foxing. 256 pages. (Stock ref 10) 7.50

115. Stewart, Mary: The Wind off the Small Isles. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1968. First Edition of Mary Stewart's novel, which is 'lit with the special magic of people and place that are the hallmarks of a famous author's best work'. Her heroine, Perdita, is secretary to the 'rerdoubtable children's novelist, Cora Gresham'. Perdita's work takes her to the Canary Islands, where she meets Michael, research assistant to a famous playwright: 'In the fierce beauty of he volcanic landscape, in the persons of Perdita and Michael, past and present meet, violently. The weird, semi-deserted island of Lanzarote is the scene for the collision which re-shapes the lives of the young lovers, as it did a hundred years ago.' Black/white illustrations by Laurence Irving. 8 vo hardback book, bound in black and grey cloth. In very good condition. Very good, unclipped dust jacket with slight edgewear. 96 pages. (Stock ref 9) 45.00

116. Streatfeild, Noel: Saplings. London: Collins, 1945. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in green cloth with pink lettering on spine. In very good condition. In original, unclipped dustjacket, which has open and closed tears over spine and edgewear. The name of a former owner (dated 5th January, 1946) is written on the front loose endpaper. 255 pages. Noel Streatfeild's fascinating account of four children and their experiences during the Second World War: 'In this novel Noel Streatfeild has created a family of four, two boys and two girls. She shows them to us first in 1939 happy and secure. In these first pages they spring to life with a clearness and poignancy they never lose during the years that follow...This is a picture of an English family, and has a purely English flavour, although the problem is European. The book is written with a charming lightness and humour, which cannot disguise the fact that it is also profound, human and wittily wise.' The celebrated chidren's and adult fiction writer, Mary Noel Streatfeild, OBE, worked in the theatre before becoming a writer. Her other books include, 'Ballet Shoes', 'The Circus is Coming' and 'A Vicarage Family'. (Stock ref 53) 20.00

117. Struther, Jan: Mrs Miniver. London: Chatto & Windus, 1939. First Edition (Second Impression). 8vo hardback book, bound in decorated cloth boards, with pink cloth over spine and gold lettering. Good condition, with slight foxing on endpapers and first few pages. No dust jacket. 288 pages. Jan Struther's (Joyce Anstruther, 1901-53) moving story about a family facing the challenges and dangers of World War Two, based on her series in The Times. 'In the dark early days of World War II, Jan Struther won the hearts of millions of readers with the story of an English family, which has since become a classic', and which was adapted into an extremely successful film, directed by William Wyler, and starring Greer Garson as Mrs Miniver. (Stock ref 350) 25.00

118. Struther, Jan: Mrs Miniver. London: Futura, 1980. First Futura Edition in generally good condition, with slight wear to edges of cover. 288 pages. Jan Struther's moving story about a family facing the challenges and dangers of World War Two. 'In the dark early days of World War II, Jan Struther won the hearts of millions of readers with the story of an English family, which has since become a classic'. Introduction by J.A. Maxtone Graham. (Stock ref 349) 4.00

119. Stuart, Esme: Harum Scarum's Fortune. London: Jarrolds, 1924. Reprint. 8vo hardback book, bound in grey cloth boards, with green lettering to front cover and spine. In fair condition, with evidence of wear in tanning to spine and some bumping/edgewear. No dust jacket. 312 pages. (Stock ref 643) 6.00

120. Thackeray, William Makepeace.: The Rose and The Ring. London: The R.S. Surtees Society, 1989. Beautiful First Edition of facsimile of original book. 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth, with front cover and spine decorated with gilt figures, flowers and lettering, against black background and patterns. Gilt edges to pages. In absolutely 'mint', unused condition with original transparent dustcover. 128 pages. W.M. Thackeray (William Makepeace Thackeray, 1811-63), the author of such novels as 'Vanity Fair, 'Pendennis' and 'The History of Henry Esmond', published 'The Rose and the Ring' in 1855. Subtitled 'The History of Prince Giglio and Prince Bulbo: A Fireside Pantomime for Great and Small Children', it tells the adventures of Prince Giglio and his pursuit of Princess Angelica, and introduces such comic characters as Prince Bulbo and Countess Gruffanuff. In the Prelude, the author wries, '...for a brief holiday, let us laugh and be as pleasant as we can. And you elder folks - a little joking and dancing, and fooling will do even you no harm. The author wishes you a merry Christmas, and welcomes you to the Fire-side Pantomime'. Extract from the biographical introduction to Thackeray's works by his daughter, Anne Lady Ritchie and black/white illustrations. (Stock ref 17) 65.00

121. Trollope, Anthony: Can You Forgive Her? Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1984. Reprint Edition of book first published by Penguin (Penguin Classics) in 1972. The first of Trollope's six 'Palliser' novels, which look at politics and political personalities in the Victorian era. With an introduction by Stephen Wall. Mass market paperback in good condition. 848 pages. (Stock ref 488) 4.00

122. Trollope, Anthony: The Last Chronicle of Barset. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1967. Trollope's last Barchester novel in the series that chronicled the doiings and disputes of the clergy and other inhabitants of the cathedral city of Barchester and its surrounding area. This novel focuses on the trials and tribulations of the devout but impoverished Revd Josiah Crawley, perpetual curate of Hogglestock. First Penguin edition of book first published in 1867. Edited by Peter Fairclough with an introduction by Laurence Lerner. Used paperback. Evidence of use, with some creases on cover and small open tear in cover at bottom of spine. but in good general condition. 871 pages. (Stock ref 228) 4.00

123. Troubridge, Lady (Laura): The Purse Strings. London: Methuen, 1929. First Edition of romantic novel by Lady Troubridge, author of the authoritative 'The Book of Etiquette' (1926). Laura Troubridge (1865-1946) was the wife of Sir Thomas Herbret Cochrane Troubridge, the 4th baronet. 8vo hardback book, bound in brown cloth with silver lettering. Good condition, but some fading and foxing. No dust jacket. Eight pages of advertisements for Methuen's publications at end of book. 245 pages. (Stock ref 591) 15.00

124. Unwin, F.T.: Pimbo. Ilfracombe: Arthur H. Stockwell Ltd, 1976. First Edition. 'The story of Pimbo, set fifty years ago in the Barnwell district of Cambridge, follows the seven year old boy through orphan days, and his fight against tuberculosis. His boyhood escapades embrace the many quaint traditions practised in Cambridge during the povery stricken years that followed the First Workd War'. By the Cambridge-born author and psychiatric nurse, F.T. Unwin, whose 'Dew on My Feet' is a continuation of Pimbo's experiences: as a psychiatric nurse. Hardback book (19 cms tall), bound in brown covers with gilt lettering on front cover and spine. In very good condition, in very good, dust jacket, designed by J.B. Simon. 193 pages. (Stock ref 694) 5.00

125. Waddell, Helen: Peter Abelard. London: Fontana, 1965. Second Impression of First Fontana Edition. Soft cover book in very good condition. 253 pages. A novel of 'haunting and tragic beauty' about Heloise and Abelard by writer and academic, Helen Waddell (1889-1965), whose other works include ''The Wandering Scholars' and 'The Desert Fathers'. (Stock ref 392) 6.00

126. Wain, John: Hurry On Down. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1961. Reprint of book which first appeared in Pengun in 1960, and which was originally published in 1953. Used mass market paperback in quite good condition, with some stains on soft covers. 252 pages. First novel by writer, academic and literary critic, John Wain (1925-94): ‘a young man’s novel...a bustling kaleidoscope of a book, by an author ...keenly observant and occasionally probing the heart of darkness’ (Sunday Times). (Stock ref 423) 5.00

127. Walpole, Hugh and Partington, Walter (eds): The Gateway To Literature: Five Centuries Of Great Tales Of Youth. London: Daily Express Publications, 1934. First Edition. 92 selections from such writers as Fanny Burney, Charlotte Bronte, Daniel Defoe, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Henry Fielding, Walter Scott, George Bernard Shaw, Tobias Smolett, Laurence Sterne, R.L. Stevenson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Anthony Trollope and Mark Twain. Introduction by Hugh Walpole (Sir Hugh Walpole, 1884 – 1941, author of ‘Rogue Herries’ and ‘The Cathedral’) and Tailpieces by Wilfred Partington. List of Authors. Black/white frontispiece and illustrations by Vernon Ward, Alan J. Bowyer and F.J.L. Streevens. Large 8vo book, bound in orange boards, with illustrations and black lettering on front cover and spine. Good condition. No dust jacket. 1021 pages. (Stock ref 246) 9.00

128. Warner, Susan: Daisy in the Field. London: Frederick Warne & Co. (undated). 8vo hardback book, in Warne's 'New Star' series. Late 19th Century. Attractively bound in green decorated cloth with gilt lettering and illustrations on front cover and spine. In good condition, with some wear and fading to the cover and missing front loose endpaper. 332 pages. Born in New York, the American writer, Susan Bogert Warner (1819-85), was a very popular author of children's and religious fiction. Her other books include 'The Wide, Wide World', 'Queechy' and 'My Desire'. 'Daisy in the Field' is set during the American Civil War. (Stock ref 24) 10.50

129. Waugh, Evelyn: The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972. 'An inability to control his fantasies sends Glibert Pinfold, a well-known author, cruising on a Ceylon-bound liner to recuperate. But to his horror the hallucinations increase and life on board becomes very embarrassing.' 1970s Penguin with cover design by Peter Bentley. Reprint of book first published by Penguin in 1962, and which first appeared in 1957. Used paperback in good condition. Some evidence of reading use and sunning of edges of pages. 223 pages. (Stock ref 219) 4.00

130. Westmacott, Mary (Agatha Christie): Absent in the Spring. London: Collins, 1973. First Edition of Collins' re-issue of book first published in 1944. 8vo hardback book, bound in dark blue cloth with silver lettering on spine. In very good condition, in good clipped dust jacket, which has edgewear and two closed tears. 192 pages. Agatha Christie's (writing as Mary Westmacott) novel or romance and suspense, which tells the story of 'a woman returning from a visit to her daughtter in Iraq, who is immobilized in an isolated Rest House by flooding of the railway tracks. Enforced solitude compels her to face up to truths about herself and her relationships which she has striven to hide, and to re-evaluate her life'. (Stock ref 13) 12.50

131. White, Antonia: The Sugar House. London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1952. First Edition of novelist Antonia White’s (Eirene Adeline Botting, 1899-1980), which reflects her own experiences: ‘the two main characters work out an odd and painful situation in the setting of a provincial touring company and a small house in Chelsea in the beginning of the nineteen-twenties’. Her other classic novels include ‘Frost in May’ and ‘The Lost Traveller’. Ex-library hardback in good condition. Dust jacket protected by transparent cover. Some library stamps. 255 pages. (Stock ref 198) 35.00

132. Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray. New York: Dell Publishing, 1966. Dell Edition of Oscar Wilde's famous novel about Dorian Gray, 'a man enmeshed in a web of evil'. Used paperback in very good condition. Seventh printing of the New Dell Edition (March, 1966). Attractively produced book with striking grey/blue/black cover and pages edged in green. 224 pages. (Stock ref 215) 4.00

133. Wodehouse, P.G.: A Damsel in Distress. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1967. Reprint of book first published by Pengun in 1961, and which first appeared in 1919. Mass market paperback in generally good condition. Some edgewear to soft cover and slight foxing on page edges. Wodehouse ‘plunges us into the toils of a Machiavellian plot at Belpher Castle’, where we meet a host of comic characters, and ‘then away we go, holding our sides’. 255 pages. (Stock ref 497) 4.00

134. Wodehouse, P.G.: A Damsel in Distress. London: Herbert Jenkins (undated). Tenth Printing of scarce P.G. Wodehouse title. 8vo hardback book, bound in original blue boards with distinctive black border to front cover and black lettering. Book dates from 1920s and is in good condition with some foxing. No dust jacket. 319 pages. 'The door of the cab opened and a girl in brown jumped in. “I’m so sorry,” she said breathlessly, “but would you mind hiding me?” This was the beginning of all the trouble. George Bevan not only hid the pretty stranger, but knocked off the hat of a peer...she is an earl’s daughter, is in love with another man...In spite of these handicaps Bevan struggles on. The book is written with the wit and humour characteristic of Mr Wodehouse at his best, His description of the earl who wanted to be happy, whereas his family insisted on his being conventional, is delightful.’ (Stock ref 477) 50.00

135. Wodehouse, P.G.: Company for Henry. London: Herbert Jenkins, 1967. First Edition. 8vo hardback book, bound in red cloth with white lettering on spine. In very good condition, in good, clipped dust jacket, designed by Osbert Lancaster. Slight wear on d/j over spine. Inscription (that book was 1967 Christmas gift) on front pastedown endpaper. 222 pages. Late novel by the master of humorous writing (Sir) P.G. (Pelham Grenville) Wodehouse (1881-1975): ‘It was particularly frustrating, just as Messrs Duff and Trotter, purveyor of wines. Spirits and liquers, threatened to put in the broker’s man, that Henry, the impoverished squire of Ashby Hall, should have been prevented from selling, for a fabulous price, a rare eighteenth-century French paper-weight. For the paper-weight was an heirloom on which the trustees of the property kept a vigilant eye. But Henry needed the money desperately...so a plot was hatched – with the most astounding and unexpected consequence, not only for Henry...but for the other protagonists in this drama’. (Stock ref 478) 30.00

136. Wodehouse, P.G.: Meet Mr Mulliner. London: Vintage Books, 1992. First Vintage Books Edition of book first published in 1927. Attractively designed soft cover book in very good condition, with cover illustration by Mark Entwistle. 176 pages. In the first of three collections of stories, Mr Mulliner, of the Angler’s Rest, tells the tallest of stories, always, by chance, having the appropriate anecdote for any number of subjects.’ ‘He has made a world for us to live and delight in’ (Evelyn Waugh). (Stock ref 368) 7.50

137. Wodehouse, P.G.: Money In The Bank. London: Herbert Jenkins, 1946. First Edition. First Printing, bound in original orange boards. 8vo book in very good condition, with some foxing on some page edges. No dust jacket. 253 pages. ‘A peer of original ideas, George, sixth Viscount Uffenham, had converted his own and his niece’s fortune into diamonds, and ingeniously hidden them at Shipley Hall, the ancestral seat. Unfortunately, an accident, due to his opposition to the convention of driving a car on the left, had impaired his memory, and, search as he would, he was unable to find his precious hoard...Precisely what astounding events transpired thereafter at Shipley Hall is faithfully chronicled in this diverting and exhilarating novel – one such as only the inimitable P.G. Wodehouse could have written.’ List of Wodehouse novels and advertisement. (Stock ref 363) 8.00

138. Wodehouse, P.G.: Pigs Have Wings. London: Herbert Jenkins, 1952. Fourth printing of First Edition. 8vo hardback, bound in original red cloth with black lettering. Very good condition in good (clipped) dustjacket. Slight sunning on top of spine. Chipping and small closed tears on d/j. 220 pages. Two pages of advertisements for Wodehouse's books. Wodehouse’s hilarious novel about the battle between Lord Emsworth of Blandings Castle and Sir Gregory Parsloe to ensure the victory of their respective pigs ( Empress of Blandings and Pride of Matchingham) in the Fat Pigs contest at the Shropshire Agricultural Show: ‘How the epic contest was won in an atmosphere already confused by the erratic course of young Penelope’s love affair, and how that doyen of the butler’s pantry – the venerable Beach – found an ally in Maudie Montrose, late of the Criterion Bar, is related in this notable addition to the Emsworth saga'. (Stock ref 43) 55.00

139. Wodehouse, P.G.: The Girl in Blue. London: Barrie & Jenkins, 1970. First Edition. Late novel by the master of humorous writing (Sir) P.G. (Pelham Grenville) Wodehouse (1881-1975): ‘“The Girl in Blue” is a Gainsborough miniature, the proud possession of a once carefree London solicitor, and before she knows where she is, she is missing. There hang in a precarious balance, pending her discovery: the future of a tottering country seat, the peace of mind of an American tycoon and the good name of his kleptomaniac sister, the happiness of a young heir and his two fiancées, the prospects of a grasping actress, the tenure of employment of a broker’s man masquerading as a butler, and the golf of the aforesaid solicitor’. 8vo hardback book, bound in blue cloth with silver lettering on spine. In very good condition, in good, unclipped, illustrated dust jacket, with picture of Wodehouse walking dog on back. However, a transparent protector is sewn to the d/j, and sellotaped to the front and back pastedown endpapers and on to the boards, suggesting ex-library book, but no stamps. Slight foxing on page edges. 192 pages. (Stock ref 243) 15.00

140. Wodehouse. P.G.: Hot Water. London: Herbert Jenkins (undated). Second printing (40,00 copies) of book first published in 1932. 8vo hardback book, bound in orange cloth boards, with black lettering on front cover and spine. In good condition, with some sunning to spine. 312 pages. Humorous novel by the writer and playwright, P.G. (Pelham Greville) Wodehouse (1881-1975), creator of Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, and Blandings Castle, and author of over ninety books: ‘Reviewing Mrs J. Wellington Gedge’s worldly goods, one would have thought her happiness must be complete. Yet this was not so. She had a small husband and a large income, and both of these she used relentlessly in her efforts to attain her great ambition – to place her unfortunate husband on an ambassadorial throne...success...rested on the shoulders of Senator Opal and the Vicomte de Blissac, but such is the way of Fate that the Senator’s daughter Jane, Pack Franklyn, Blair Eggleston and Soup Slattery and Oily Carlisle were all in measure responsible for the sudden turn of events.’ 8 pages of advertisements for other Herbert Jenkins books. (Stock ref 426) 8.00

141. Woolf, Virginia: The Waves. London: The Hogarth Press, 1933. First Hogarth Press Uniform Edition. Virginia Woolf's experimental novel, or 'play-poem', which traces the development of the lives of six characters by means of soliloquies, within the framework of third-person descriptions of a coastal setting at various points in a day, was first published by The Hogarth Press (founded by Leonard and Virginia Woolf in 1917) in October, 1931. This copy is from the First Edition of The Hogarth Press Uniform Edition, which was published in 1933. Bound in green boards, with its distinctive peacock-blue, unclipped dustj acket, the book is in exceptionally good condition, as is the d/j. The book has a yellow stamp on the spine of the d/j: 'VIRGINIA WOOLF * UNIFORM EDITION'. There is very slight sunning of the dust jacket over the spine and a small mark on the front of the d/j. 8vo hardback book. 325 pages. (Stock ref 5) 150.00

142. Wouk, Herman: The Caine Mutiny. London: Jonathan Cape, 1952. 8vo hardback. Third Reprint (February 1952) of the First UK Edition, published by Jonathan Cape in October 1951. Very good condition in dust jacket. Previous owner's name on flyleaf and slight wear to edges of d/j. 494 pages. Herbert Wouk's 1951 bestselling novel about a mutiny and subsequent court-martial in the US Navy during World War II.The 1954 film of the book starred Humphrey Bogart as Captain Queeg. (Stock ref 266) 6.50

143. Wyndham, John: Chocky. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1977. Reprint of book first published by Penguin in 1970, and which first appeared in 1968. Mass market paperpack, with a cover design by Harry Willock. In generally very good condition, with slight creasing/rubbing to back soft covers. John Wyndham's (John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris, 1903-69) story about a boy whose conversations with himself become increasingly intense, while his intellectual abilities develop to extraordinary levels, and who then tells his parents about 'Chocky, the person who lives in his head. 153 pages. (Stock ref 507) 5.00

144. Yonge, Charlotte M.: The Pigeon Pie. Oxford/London: A.R. Mowbray & Co., 1905. New Edition of novel first published in book form in 1860. Hardback book, attractively bound in red cloth, with floral illustrations and gold and black lettering on front cover and spine. In good condition, with some foxing and sunning to boards and missing front loose endpaper. 135 pages. The popular novelist and writer, Charlotte M. (Mary) Yonge (1823-1901) was born in Otterbourne, Hampshire, where she spent her life. Deeply religious, and strongly influenced by Revd John Keble, one of the founders of the Oxford Movement and Vicar of Hursley, she used her literary talents to promote her religious and ethical ideas. Her 160 novels and other books include 'The Heir of Radclyffe', 'Heartsease'. 'The Prince and the Page', 'The Caged Lion' and 'The Dove in the Eagle's Nest'. 'Pigeon Pie' is set in 1551, following the execution of Charles I and the defeat of his son, Charles Stuart (later Charles II) at the battle of Worcester, which brought the English Civil War to a conclusion. The story traces the experiences of the Royalist Woodley family, who suffer poverty and persecution for their loyalty to the Stuarts, but enter happier times after the end of the Commonwealth and Restoration of Charles II in 1660. Charlotte M. Yonge takes the opportunity to praise the virtues of loyalty and common sense, while condemning treachery and foolishness. 16.00 + 2.75 postage/packaging. o (Stock ref 22) 16.00


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